Martin Sterling Giesing was born at 7:45 p.m. on Jan. 26, 1938. Weighed 8 lb. 4 oz. with white hair. Baptized on Jan. 30, 1938 at Immaculate Conception Church. He went to Immaculate Conception grade school in Union, Missouri and Saint Francis Borgia high school in Washington, Missouri. Martin was in the Missouri National Guard at age 16 till age 18 1/2, then he tried to join the Navy but failed his physical and was medically discharged. He spent about two years as an auxiliary policeman in Union, Missouri. He raised his sons on his own. Martin was an Inventory and Quality Inspector most of working life. Upon death he will be cremated and buried at Midlawn Memorial Gardens, Union, Missouri.


MY LIFE:

    I was told that when I was four in 1942 and my mother was pregnant with my brother Richard, we had to be removed from a flooded home in a row boat. It was near the Mississippi River near Foley, Missouri. My dad was a guard at the Lock and Dam during World War Two.

    When my uncle who was in the Marine Corps came home from fighting the Japanese, he gave me a large red fire truck for my birthday. This was the same day he got married. One summer he let me use his carbine from the Marine Corps to kill snakes on my great-grandfathers farm.

    I went to Immaculate Conception grade school. I was the teachers pet for all eight years because I always helped them. At the end of the school year, the nuns always gave me some gift. When I was in grade eight, I did their errands for them during school time and in the summer I would help them also.

    After grade school, I was going to study to be a Catholic priest. My biggest mistake in my life was that I did not do it.

    Then I went to St. Francis Borgia High School. No sports or anything after school because I had to ride the school bus and did not have a car. My last year at school, I was the artist for the school paper and year book.

    When I became 16, (sophomore in school) I joined the National Guard (Heavy Mortar Company). Since I did not have a car, my sergeant would take me to the meetings. In the summer we spent two weeks at an army base. We had training in riot control in case of a riot at the state prison. After I was 18 1/2 years old, I enlisted in the Navy but failed my physical. The Draft Board made me 4-F. I received an honorable discharge 8 years later.

    My summers before I was 18, I spent walking or riding my bike around town and visiting the lady at the Draft Board and my great aunt, who was the secretary to the County School Superintendent. Also talked to the old men who spent their time sitting on the benches at the courthouse. Also spent time at the soda counters. Learned a lot from these people.

    Had different jobs from 1956 to 2000. Run a bowling alley. Ground up meat for a pot pie factory. Inventory control at a factory that made metal sewer pipes. St. Louis Police department telephone switchboard keeping track of beat policeman (before walkie-talkies) they used phones (call boxes) on street corners to call in once an hour. Counting money at a bank and working in the stockroom and printing department at the same bank. Inventory and Quality Control at a place that made wall paneling. Shipping clerk at a shoe factory. Quality Control at a factory that made ring binders and office supplies.

    Had to retire early in 2001 because the place where I worked moved to Mexico. Had to sell house and used the profit to buy a used mobile home. Over the years, four places that I worked at closed their doors. Over the years because of the closings, I had lost two homes, one mobile home and three cars.

   I was fired for the following reasons: #1- Fired because I had TB. (I did not have TB). #2- Fired for asking for a raise in pay that I was promised. #3- Fired for not talking to my ex wife. Both of us fired!

MY HOBBY:

    Since 1985, I have been researching families that are related to me and my family. I started out with a little note book that my dad had written that had his siblings and uncles and aunts.

    Then I went to a lot of cemeteries checking for relatives. Also wrote to every one in Germany that had my dad and mom's last name. After I got internet service in the 90's, I put what I had on a website. Some saw the website and sent me information from Germany, France, Netherlands and United States.

    One day going to a cemetery, my son and I almost died when we were going down a hill (at bottom is Missouri River) and the brakes on the car did not work. I made a quick right turn and the car hit a ditch right at the cemetery that we were looking to check. After checking the cemetery and getting pulled out of the ditch, I drove the car 85 miles back home without brakes because it was Sunday and no repair shops were open. Found out later that the brake line broke and leaked fluid.

    Now you can check on the internet for the same information that I risked my life to get. Makes it a lot easier.